Saturday, June 24, 2017
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Mei Lin Yap’s latest article details her new Disability Inclusion & Advocacy Society in Trinity College, Dublin.

My name is Mei Lin Yap and I am a young woman with an intellectual disability. I have teamed up with a fellow Trinity graduate, Margaret Turley, to start a Society in Trinity College Dublin. I met Margaret on a lecturing project in Trinity College in which we were both involved.

Kate Butler has carried out a detailed review of the new act, which considers all of the main people involved in its provisions, and the principal changes for people with intellectual disabilities and others.

Last December, the President of Ireland signed a new piece of legislation into law that has the potential to affect every adult in the State: the Assisted Decision-Making (Capacity) Act 2015. The Act governs the law in relation to adults who are experiencing difficulties with decision making,

Sarah Lennon takes a close look at what the new legislation really means in practical terms for people with an intellectual disability, helping them to determine their own lives and activities...

The Assisted-Decision Making Act is now the law of the land, so we have a bit of a wait until the law comes into force later this year - enabling us all some time to get our heads around the implications of the new law and how it will practically change all of our lives.

Deirdre Corby introduces HIQA‘s new guide and leaflet, designed to support people who use services in making their own decisions about their lives.

HIQA have published a new guide called Supporting people’s autonomy: a guidance document, and also a separate explanatory leaflet called My Choices: My Autonomy. The reason for putting this guide together was to help support people who use services to make their own choices and decisions about their lives.

Sarah Corcoran has recently secured satisfactory accommodation for her brother John now life has changed for them, but only after a worrying and protracted succession of meetings, applications and representations. She details this frustrating process for Frontline Ireland…

Our story begins in June 2012. At the time, I was 25 years old and my brother John was 22 years old. We lost our mother three years previously and now we had just lost our father. Our father’s death was sudden and we were completely unprepared. My brother John has an intellectual disability and had been living in the family home with my father as his carer.

John Dolan, Seanadóir and CEO of the Disability Federation of Ireland, was successful in his bid for the Seanad in 2016. Here, he outlines his reasons for entering the race...

I have been asked to outline why I am a candidate for the Seanad election. Put simply the Dail is the assembly of publicly elected representatives who elect the Taoiseach, eventually, and to whom the Government report. The Seanad is elected by less than 1,200 people, namely the members of every County and City Council, the newly elected TDs and the outgoing 60 Seanad members.

Paul Alford shows the possibilities for decision-making and living an independent life in the community, available to people with disabilities with a positive attitude and support from helpful people.

Paul Alford

My name is Paul Alford. I have worked for Inclusion Ireland for the last ten years as a self-advocate. I believe in rights for all people with intellectual disabilities. I believe all people should live as independently as possible .....