Tuesday, November 21, 2017

Advocacy

TALKING OUT IN THE KINGDOM

Members of the Advocacy Group, who continue to speak out for themselves and others in Kerry Parents and Friends Association: Michelle O Leary; Josephine Ryan; Jimmy O Shea; Patrick Gallivan; Kathleen Healy and Denise Ridout (not in picture).
In 2009 we set up an advocacy group in The Old Monastery Day Service, Killarney. We spent some time working on personal and interpersonal development which helped our self-awareness and also improved our abilities to be part of a group. Using role play, we developed good communication skills...

QUESTIONS AND QUANDARIES TO PONDER IN OUR EFFORTS TO ADVOCATE

Advocacy is an alluring concept. Everything thinks it is great—like apple pie and motherhood. But advocacy, while intellectually seductive, is nothing if it is not complex. An advocate is defined by Webster’s dictionary as ‘one who pleads the cause of another; one who defends, vindicates, or espouses to the cause by argument; a pleader in favour of someone; an upholder; a defender who supports and vindicates.’...

National Advocacy Service

The National Advocacy Service for people with disabilities (NAS) is funded and supported by the Citizens Information Board and results from the National Disability Strategy, which also produced the Disability Act. The purpose is to give the person with a disability a spokesperson/interpreter/ assistant, particularly at formal decision-making forums where they might be at a disadvantage. It does not yet have statutory powers...

ADVOCACY TRAINING IN THE MIDLANDS

Mary Stone and Catriona Carroll, Tanyard, Claire Walsh and Mary Tynan Dove House, Joe Kerr Rowanberry, Madeline Hyland and Josie Lynam Oak House.
The Muiríosa Foundation recognised the need for advocacy training for service users in the Laois/Offaly region and contact was made with a local Vocational Education Centre (VEC) to discuss the training required. Following a number of discussions, a training package was designed and a tutor from the local VEC agreed to act as facilitator. Over the six-month training period, representative service users attended the course from Dove House (Abbeyleix), Rowanberry (Portlaoise), Oak House (Portarlington), and The Tanyard Resource Centre (Tullamore)...

NATIONAL ADVOCACY SERVICE FOR PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES: Capacity and consent in advocacy

The National Advocacy Service for People with Disabilities was formally launched on the 30th March 2011 at Dublin Castle by the Minister for Social Protection Ms Joan Burton TD. The National Advocacy Service provides independent, representative advocacy for vulnerable people with disabilities. It is a countrywide service managed by five Citizens Information Services in Dublin (Clondalkin), Westmeath, Offaly, Waterford...

‘But I can’t tell you what I want’ —Consent, capacity and intellectual disability

In Ireland today, it is estimated that there about 25,500 citizens with intellectual or disability (ID). For many, the inability to communicate effectively or to understand the variety of options available in any given circumstance means that they cannot give or withhold consent to a variety of important issues in their lives. The questions around capacity to consent also...

Advocacy Group

My name is Ray and I am the VOICES representative for Choices. My name is Orla and I used to be a VOICES Rep, I used to explain things about the meetings. I’m Mark and I was a VOICES Rep last year. Our last VOICES chairperson retired after many years. We needed a new chairperson. We had to interview people...

Advocacy Clinic

On Wednesday 21 July 2010, Voices had an Advocacy Clinic in Mounttown Resource Centre. 83 people came from SJOG Carmona Services, SJOG Kildare Services, SJOG STEP Enterprises, Enable Ireland, Daughters of Charity Services, Cheeverstown House, Prosper Fingal and St Michael’s House. The Voices Advocacy group Representatives helped people to work on the different activities. Roy and Aoife greeted everyone as...

The role of advocacy in Inclusion Ireland

Introduction Advocacy is a word often misunderstood. Put simply, advocacy is about speaking up. The word advocacy comes from the Latin word advocare—meaning to call. The term advocacy is also used to explain many different approaches from campaigning to lobbying. This article seeks to provide some clarity to the term advocacy as it is understood from the perspective of Inclusion...

Why Advocacy?

Musings of an Advocate... My first contact with and knowledge of advocacy was over twenty years ago. I was a manager within learning disability services in Britain and remember thinking that it was a great idea. However I think I was also secretly glad that advocacy representations never came to my doorstep as I wasn’t quite sure if my rightsbased...