Friday, November 24, 2017

Bereavement

Remembering: The Significance of Ritual

The birth of a child is the beginning of a process of change for every family. New roles and routines are established, relationships altered, new and varied friendships formed and experiences in the wider community take on a different perspective. The birth of a child with intellectual disability brings all of these changes along with the added dimension of a link and relationship with a service provider.

Avoiding Loneliness in older people with an Intellectual Disability – Lessons from the IDS-TILDA study

What are the circumstances in a person’s life that best help them avoid or overcome loneliness? For some people as they age loneliness is an ever-present risk. Mounting losses to social resources and deterioration in health increase the risk of experiencing loneliness.

The fight for residential accommodation for the disabled – My story

Our story begins in June 2012. At the time, I was 25 years old and my brother John was 22 years old. We lost our mother three years previously and now we had just lost our father. Our father’s death was sudden and we were completely unprepared. My brother John has an intellectual disability and had been living in the family home with my father as his carer.

End-of-life: What are the needs of Adults with Intellectual Disability?

Ireland’s independent health safety, quality and accountability regulatory body, The Health Information & Quality Authority (HIQA) published the National Standards for Residential Services for Children and Adults with Disabilities in 2013. Within these standards, the need for appropriate end-of-life care for adults with Intellectual Disability (ID) was highlighted.

PARENTS WILL CRY TOO: Parental Bereavement

For more than twenty years, the aftermath of the death of a loved one in the lives of people with intellectual disabilities was starkly revealed to be an issue sidestepped awkwardly by services and family relatives. Of course, previously to that it was considered that people with intellectual disabilities were not emotionally capable of feeling grief. However, once there was recognition that people with intellectual disabilities had emotional selves, anxieties arose about how best to manage those emotions.

MAKING A WILL: WHAT YOU SHOULD KNOW

Planning for the future can be a very difficult and worrying thing to do. Planning for a future after you have gone can be one of the most difficult and upsetting tasks of all. It is no surprise that many people delay thinking about making a will, but delaying and ultimately failing to make a will can have serious consequences for your family, especially if you have a family member with an intellectual disability...

GRIEF AND LOSS

It is hard to write about grief and loss because they are private and individual experiences, even in a world where most things are public. Occasionally grief becomes public, as in the reactions to Princess Diana’s death which ended up expressing people’s sorrow at their own losses...

Using Life Story Books to Support People with Intellectual Disabilities Who Have Been Bereaved

Background: Described by Fahlberg as ‘...an account of a child’s [person’s] life in words, pictures, photographs and documents, made by the child [person] with the help of a trusted friend [helper]’ (Fahlberg 2012), life story books (LSBs) originated in adoption and fostering services as a tool to build the child’s sense of personal identity, and thereby to support their ability to deal with crisis and change...

BEREAVEMENT AND PEOPLE WITH INTELLECTUAL DISABILITIES: SUGGESTIONS FOR SUPPORT

ealing with the death of someone close is a difficult and painful event. For individuals with an intellectual disability, personal loss brings the same distressing emotional reactions felt by relatives and friends (Dodd and Guerin 2009; Gilrane-McGarry and Taggart 2007). However, there is a need to prepare and support people with ID who have been bereaved...

A MATTER OF LIFE AND DEATH

The Pastoral Support Service has grown to become an integral part of the support service that is hallmarked by the essence of inclusion in the ultimate recognition of the importance of spirituality in the lives of all stakeholders, especially for staff in their daily work with people with intellectual disability, the individual families and broader society...