Saturday, June 24, 2017
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Defining supervision is a rather complex task, writes Jenna Doogan. “The struggle to define supervision reflects a growing recognition of how complex the supervisory process is”. Benefiel and Holton, (2010).

Not so long ago I conducted a piece of research to explore and investigate supervisors’ and managers’ experiences of supervision in the workplace in Not-for-Profit organisations. According to Share and McElwee, p163 (2005), professional supervision is a partnership process of ongoing reflection and feedback between a named supervisor and supervisee to ensure and enhance effective practice.

John Giles examines Complaints - what they are and how to deal with them…

At a social occasion some time ago a very upper-class lady, obviously of the better sort, rounded on my wife and exclaimed “are you a complainer?”. That incident has become part of family lore, but it’s a good question if you have a dependant or you yourself are at the receiving end of care services.

Sarah Corcoran has recently secured satisfactory accommodation for her brother John now life has changed for them, but only after a worrying and protracted succession of meetings, applications and representations. She details this frustrating process for Frontline Ireland…

Our story begins in June 2012. At the time, I was 25 years old and my brother John was 22 years old. We lost our mother three years previously and now we had just lost our father. Our father’s death was sudden and we were completely unprepared. My brother John has an intellectual disability and had been living in the family home with my father as his carer.

Adrian Noonan, self-advocate PRO at Inclusion Ireland, wishes for greater awareness of the needs of people with intellectual disabilities at all levels of the democratic process.

People with Intellectual disabilities are not supported or encouraged to register to vote, or to vote, in Ireland by government or their agencies, who can set up and organise, advertise and have training workshops around the country. This could be done with the help and support of disability advocacy organisations.

The theme of the National Disability Authority’s Annual Conference (12th October) in Croke Park is ensuring the availability of mainstream public services for people with disabilities. The How Walkable Is Your Town? report took centre-stage at the launch by Minister Frances Fitzgerald…

It has been Government policy for the last fifteen years, and a legal requirement for the last ten years, that mainstream public services would be planned and delivered to include people with disabilities....

Cormac Cahill of Inclusion Ireland shows us a little of what can be achieved in purpose-built, accessible accommodation for people with physical disabilities.

Accessible facilities 1

Muscular Dystrophy Ireland (MDI) is a voluntary organisation that provides information and support to people in Ireland with muscular dystrophy and allied neuromuscular conditions, and their families, through a range of support services.

Jeanette McCallion welcomes movement towards a community-based social care model, but cautions that complex medical needs among people with intellectual disability still require medical services, previously provided in congregated settings, to be maintained and improved in this environment.

Jeanette and Cliona

In December last I watched RTE’s Primetime Investigates on Áras Attracta, Bungalow 3. Knowing in advance that the footage would be bad, I debated with myself whether I should make myself watch it or not. The main reason for my unease is that my seventeen year old sister Cliona has profound ID as well as an extreme epilepsy syndrome that no seizure drug has ever been able to influence.

Kathleen Lynch, TD, Minister for primary Care, Social Care (Disabilities/older people) and Mental Health introduces Frontline's first e-publication and in doing so addresses the issues of Standards, Regulation and Quality of life.

Kathleen-Lynch-TD

People with disabilities should be given the opportunity to live as full a life as possible and to live with their families, and as part of their communities, for as long as possible. Every person who uses our disability services and our services for older people, is entitled to expect and receive supports of the highest standard and to live in an atmosphere of safety and care.