Monday, September 25, 2017
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by Stephen Kealy

Stephen Kealy

Intellectual disability is a well-researched field of study, generating a considerable number of references in any Google search. What is always challenging is converting research to practice. There is also considerable work completed on the added value to the person with an intellectual disability moving from institutional settings to live in the community, as well as the importance of keeping housing solutions—as far as possible—individualised, to maximise the benefits for the person. Yet some services supported by the HSE have paid insufficient attention to what is known to work for people seeking a better life with all the added benefits for their health and wellbeing...

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by Stephen Kealy

Stephen Kealy

In the past in Ireland, it was not unusual that when a husband died their widow did not always go to the graveyard for the burial. Children, depending on their age, were also often prevented from attending their parent’s funeral. In both situations, well intentioned relatives and friends wanted to minimise their emotional fallout, not realising that active engagement with the grieving was an important part of the process of dealing with loss. This issue of Frontline has the theme of grief and loss in the lives of people with an intellectual disability...

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by Stephen Kealy

Stephen Kealy

It is always interesting and enjoyable to watch youngsters use electronic equipment with such ease, with no inhibition in finding out how a particular piece of hardware (with its accompanying software) works—maybe with lots of trial and error, but focused on achieving their goal. Children as young as 18 months are enthralled by a single switch operation on an iPad or other electronic devices. Looking at students at a university lecture highlights the ubiquitous importance of the laptop. Many National Schools have multimedia available in the classroom and many pupils have access to iPads or laptops...

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by Stephen Kealy

Stephen Kealy

This issue of Frontline looks at some of the issues that families live with in providing for their disabled son or daughter over the life span. Parents very often talk about hearing the news of their child’s disability and they describe it in many different ways. Others identify how disability has changed their lives and permeates their day-to-day living; they talk about the ongoing struggles for services, and even the right to be heard. For many parents, this is a journey into a labyrinth—with many false starts and cul de sacs. The journey to the centre of the labyrinth can be lonely and anxiety provoking. When that centre is reached, many parents hope their son or daughter will have honed their hard won skills to be able to live ‘independent lives’, but they are often frustrated by the unreliability of state and community supports to facilitate that continuing journey for their family member...

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by Stephen Kealy

Stephen Kealy

Late summer can be an exciting time for many 17 and 18 year olds as they take satisfaction in the points earned in their Leaving Certificates and look forward to attending a third-level college. For students disappointed in their exam results there are multiple educational and training options available to them—opportunities which will allow them to build a life for themselves independent of their parents...

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Stephen Kealy

This issue of Frontline has as its theme forensic issues in disability. All articles have detailed references which are not included for space reasons, but they are available from the Editor on request. People with disabilities commit fewer crimes than able-bodied people, but they are disproportionally represented in higher numbers within the custodial system. Many of the topics discussed in the articles here are not often openly aired, but attention does need to be paid to them, and, in particular, how as a society we balance competing rights...

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by Stephen Kealy

Stephen Kealy

Nemo iudex in sua causa – no man should be a judge in his own case. Essentially what this means in practice is – ‘how was a person heard?’ This applies to people on either side of the process. Fair procedures demand that a person is heard not only without bias, but also that any decisions taken about a person are not taken without that person having an opportunity to be heard and be assisted to respond...

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by Stephen Kealy

Stephen Kealy

The cover of this issue features Cillian having fun—and that is a large component of a good life. The summer paralympians reminded us what can be achieved in spite of what appear to be significant obstacles—achievements that reflected their interest, determination, motivation and desire to succeed—a real demonstration of the art of the possible...

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by Stephen Kealy

GUBU-Grotesque, unbelievable, bizarre and unprecedented. Who would have thought that a government would allow itself again to be in such a position—and yet that...

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This issue of Frontline comes at a time of reported over-spends by hospitals in excess of €100 million for the first quarter of 2012....