Monday, March 27, 2017
359FansLike
453FollowersFollow

This article explores the experiences of participants of an Independent Living Skills Group: what they learned; how they learned it; and why decision making is so important in the context of the current Irish disability climate.

Before you leave the house every day, you have already made numerous decisions. You have chosen when to get up, you have chosen whether or not to brush your teeth, you’ve chosen what to wear, and you’ve chosen what to eat for breakfast. Without realising, you have made a significant amount of decisions.

Fran, Molly and Nuala detail a life of struggle, the achievement of home ownership and getting to the stage of independence with the aid of focused services and individualized funding…

Fran and Molly

As a thirty-five-year-old woman I’m about to celebrate my first year as a home owner. I now have a front door and a place that reflects who I am. A place I call my own. Most importantly I have a home that allows me to feel safe and to grow as a person....

On 30th May 2016, over 200 people attended a seminar entitled ‘Personal Budgets’ hosted by Inclusion Ireland and Down Syndrome Ireland. It was in the context of the commitment in the new programme for government to set up a task force for Ireland to move forward to give people with disabilities the choice of a personal budget. The new Minister for State with responsibility for Disability was in attendance. At the moment, almost all funding in Ireland goes to traditional services.

Good morning all, thank you to Paddy and the team at Inclusion Ireland for organising today’s event and the invitation to speak with you today. My name is Avril Webster and I am here on behalf of our son Stephen who is 18 and leaving school next month. I am here today to talk about choice....

Julie Stansfield also spoke recently at Inclusion Ireland and Down Syndrome Ireland’s Personalised Funding conference in Dublin…

I was delighted to come to Inclusion Ireland’s Personal Budgets event in Dublin, as the new minister displayed his commitment to giving people and families in Ireland more control over their support.

Kate Butler has carried out a detailed review of the new act, which considers all of the main people involved in its provisions, and the principal changes for people with intellectual disabilities and others.

Last December, the President of Ireland signed a new piece of legislation into law that has the potential to affect every adult in the State: the Assisted Decision-Making (Capacity) Act 2015. The Act governs the law in relation to adults who are experiencing difficulties with decision making,

Sarah Lennon takes a close look at what the new legislation really means in practical terms for people with an intellectual disability, helping them to determine their own lives and activities...

The Assisted-Decision Making Act is now the law of the land, so we have a bit of a wait until the law comes into force later this year - enabling us all some time to get our heads around the implications of the new law and how it will practically change all of our lives.