Saturday, June 24, 2017
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Eilish King shows us an innovative idea for recording, keeping and showing your treasured life experiences in electronic form…

Have you ever noticed that as we grow older it becomes harder to remember important stories and information about our lives? These memories hold lots of information about ourselves, and the way we like to live our lives. Life stories can be a good way of gathering up the stories and information about ourselves, so that we can make sure we continue to live our lives as we would like.

Geraldine McCabe details her experience of how the Irish education system is failing our children with Intellectual Disabilities. This article was originally a submission by Geraldine McCabe to the UN Day of General Discussion (DGD) on the right to education for persons with disabilities, held on 15 April 2015, at Palais des Nations, Geneva.

My experience relates to my daughter Shannon- Shannon has Down Syndrome and her experience highlights the difficulties children with special needs have in getting the opportunity to develop and contribute to society.

Sarah Lennon assesses the progress of the proposed capacity legislation, and previews the impact that legislation will have on decision-making for people with an intellectual disability

For those who have campaigned for modern capacity law through the years, there was an important milestone recently. The Assisted Decision-Making (Capacity) Bill 2013 progressed through select committee stage – which is the third stage in a five-stage process of making law. Stages 4 and 5, called report and final stage respectively, are normally seen as procedural and there is genuine optimism that the end of the road is in sight.

Mick Teehan introduces us to one college student who is realising inclusion and achievement in education.

Meet Stephen Lyons, a student at the Institute of Technology Tallaght (ITT) who has travelled his own unique and difficult path towards achieving his goal of attending college and further developing his passion and skills in the area of Creative Digital Media. Stephen is highly regarded by his fellow students and lecturers alike and is described as being an active, contributing and popular student.

Frontline contributors illustrate the difficulties associated with independent living for people who live with intellectual disability.

I feel like I would be better off outside of the area. I don’t feel safe in the area because there are some dangerous people there. There were threats being made, and the guards investigated and they asked if there were more threats afterwards. Two weeks later there were more threats made towards me. I said to the social worker “if you can get me out of the area I would be prepared to move anywhere”.

Andrew Murray tells us about his sucesses in College, sport and his busy work life. Work has made him more independent, allowing him to have new experinces, meet new people and build his confidence.

Andrew-Murray eating food

Born in Hong Kong 7 April 1992. Moved to Dublin in July 2000- I have one older brother, James and a younger Sister, Lianne. I love travelling and meeting people. I play golf, table tennis and basketball with Blackrock Flyers Special Olympics club. I won a silver medal for golf at the national games in Limerick last year. I did the CCL course in Trinity College from 2010 to 2012.

Deirdre Corby highlights the importance of keeping up your reading and writing skills.

Learning language and how to communicate starts from the day you are born. We use language to explain how we feel about things, and to communicate with people around us. While we are learning speech and ways to communicate, we are learning things that will also help us with learning to read and write (literacy). Being able to read and write is important as it helps us in school, in work and in life generally. So, literacy is one of those areas that if we have difficulties with it, that can have an impact on our quality of life.

Anna Kingston regrets the loss of so many of our young people to emigration, and makes a compelling case for meaningful occupation for people with intellectual disability in modern Ireland.

Youth unemployment in Ireland is currently over 22 percent, and Irish parents are heartbroken watching their young adult sons and daughters emigrate to far away shores for work as there is nothing here for them. As difficult as this is, these young people are, in my opinion, lucky as they are able to emigrate and find a meaningful occupation elsewhere...

Anita Stefańska, PhD, University of Poznań, Poland discusses the benefits of drama and theatre in education for people with intellectual disability

Boosting resourcefulness and optimism in people with disabilities, by highlighting their independence and involvement in the creative process, is one of the objectives of the author's concept of the theatre therapy named Theatre of Thought.