Tuesday, December 12, 2017

Forensic Issues

The little bird with the broken wing

On Saturday the 15th of September, 2012, an event took place in a large midlands town which would as it concluded, turn an eye on the role and pressures of the carer in assisting the severely disabled.

The therapeutic milieu under fire: Security and insecurity in forensic mental health edited by John Adlam, et al.

This book explores the personal and interpersonal complexities taking place within the therapeutic community, together with destructive processes that have external origins (such as governmental and health-care commissioning). These ‘attacks’ take place under the guise of policy changes, uncertainties around funding and commissioning, service cuts and, in some cases, they result in the closure of iconic services, such as the Henderson Hospital...

INTELLECTUAL DISABILITY AND THE LAW IN 21st CENTURY IRELAND: SOME PRACTICAL CASES TO CONSIDER

When you or I offend and break the law in Ireland we can expect the full rigors of that law, with all its sanctions apportioned. We expect the law to deal with us in a fair and balanced way and if we are found guilty we must pay for the crime. However, if you have an intellectual disability and you break the law you may have a very different experience...

‘HEAR NO EVIL, SPEAK NO EVIL, SEE NO EVIL’: IRELAND’S FAILURE TO CALL A CRIME A CRIME

The word ‘forensic’ relates to the application of scientific methods and techniques to the investigation of crime. My work as a forensic psychotherapist should then logically be concerned with victims and perpetrators of crime. Because, however, most of my clients tend to be people with an intellectual disability, crime and the criminal justice system are remarkably...

DOES THE CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM CREATE CRIMINALS?

Forensic Psychological Services (FPS) provides clinical and forensic services to organisations and to individuals in the public and private sectors. Referrals to FPS are made by the HSE, the gardaí, legal and medical professions, the courts, therapeutic services, professional bodies and individual clients. FPS provides psychological assessments, risk assessments, victim impact statements, parenting capacity assessments, expert witness testimony in family, civil and criminal courts, and individual and group psychotherapy.

Sexuality and Adolescents with Developmental Disabilities

It is important to acknowledge when working with young people who have engaged in sexually harmful behaviour (SHB), that we cannot automatically apply what we know about adult sexual offending to young people, and equally what we know about young people and sexuality will not always fit for young people with Developmental Disabilities (DD). The term DD is used here as an umbrella term to incorporate intellectual disabilities and Autism...

FORENSIC QUESTIONS: IS THE UK EXPERIENCE RELEVANT IN IRELAND?

The recent Winterbourne Scandal in the UK (Department of Health 2012) is a reminder of the importance of designing, commissioning and providing services which give people with intellectual disabilities the support they need close to home, and which are in line with well established best practice...

GIVING EVIDENCE

Imagine for a moment that you are the decision maker in some kind of hearing, for example, a court case. You’re part of the jury and hear the following exchange between the Judge and the witness giving evidence...

Respond & forensic psychotherapy

I have worked at Respond in London for almost 11 years and am employed as a consultant forensic psychotherapist. Respond is an organisation that provides assessment and treatment services for children and adults with intellectual disabilities who have experienced abuse and/or who have abused others...

PEOPLE WITH INTELLECTUAL DISABILITIES AND SEXUALLY ABUSIVE BEHAVIOUR

Since the 1980s, it has been known that people with intellectual disabilities are particularly likely to be sexually abused, compared to other care groups. It has turned out that most of the abusers are men, and that roughly 50% them are family members or staff. But roughly 50% are men who themselves have intellectual disabilities, often men sharing services of some kind with the victims (Turk and Brown 1993; Brown et al. 1995; McCarthy and Thompson 1997)...