Saturday, July 22, 2017
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Frontline Issue 102

Kate Butler has carried out a detailed review of the new act, which considers all of the main people involved in its provisions, and the principal changes for people with intellectual disabilities and others.

Last December, the President of Ireland signed a new piece of legislation into law that has the potential to affect every adult in the State: the Assisted Decision-Making (Capacity) Act 2015. The Act governs the law in relation to adults who are experiencing difficulties with decision making,

Sarah Lennon takes a close look at what the new legislation really means in practical terms for people with an intellectual disability, helping them to determine their own lives and activities...

The Assisted-Decision Making Act is now the law of the land, so we have a bit of a wait until the law comes into force later this year - enabling us all some time to get our heads around the implications of the new law and how it will practically change all of our lives.

Deirdre Corby introduces HIQA‘s new guide and leaflet, designed to support people who use services in making their own decisions about their lives.

HIQA have published a new guide called Supporting people’s autonomy: a guidance document, and also a separate explanatory leaflet called My Choices: My Autonomy. The reason for putting this guide together was to help support people who use services to make their own choices and decisions about their lives.

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Con Lucey of CoAction West Cork is an avid road-bowling enthusiast, and gives us a flavour of this fast-paced and exciting sport that is peculiar to parts of Ireland.

Road bowling is an Irish sport, in which competitors attempt to take the fewest throws to propel a metal ball along a predetermined course of country roads. The sport is mainly played in the Counties of Armagh and Cork, although there are other small strongholds in Mayo (Aughagower) & parts of Louth.

Kevin Murphy illustrates how he managed to broaden his horizons, meet new people and travel – and all for his love of West Ham Football Club.

I have been a part of WALK since 2002. Sport is a huge part of my life, particularly football. I enjoy watching football – both through going to games or watching on TV- and talking about the highs and lows the next morning with friends in work. I live in Inchicore in Dublin and regularly take trips on the LUAS to Tallaght to watch Shamrock Rovers, but my club is West Ham United.

Emma Kinsella gives us her experience on How to Stay Positive…

I attend Sunbeam House Services every day. I have a lot of friends that I care for. It is important to have a good relationship with friends. In the training centre, I do Art, Pottery, Computers, Horticulture, Woodwork, Literacy and Numeracy, Music, Drama, Hiking, Cooking, Sewing, Sports and Chair Yoga. I also go on trips and holidays.

Sarah Corcoran has recently secured satisfactory accommodation for her brother John now life has changed for them, but only after a worrying and protracted succession of meetings, applications and representations. She details this frustrating process for Frontline Ireland…

Our story begins in June 2012. At the time, I was 25 years old and my brother John was 22 years old. We lost our mother three years previously and now we had just lost our father. Our father’s death was sudden and we were completely unprepared. My brother John has an intellectual disability and had been living in the family home with my father as his carer.

Jerome Corby argues that the disability sector in Ireland needs a strong voice at the government table, in order to ensure people with disabilities are adequately supported and resourced as the Irish economy emerges from recession.

As we approach the possibility of a government being formed, it’s worth reflecting on what is required of a new Health ministry with responsibility for improving the lives of people with disability and their families.