Friday, November 24, 2017

Frontline Issue 37

UN STANDARD RULES ON THE EQUALIZATION OF OPPORTUNITIES FOR DISABLED PEOPLE

PRECONDITIONS FOR EQUAL PARTICIPATION Rule 1: Awareness-raising States should take action to raise awareness in society about persons with disabilities, their rights, their needs, their potential and their contribution. Rule 2: Medical care States should ensure the provision of effective medical care to persons with disabilities. Rule 3: Rehabilitation States should ensure the provision of rehabilitation services to persons with disabilities in order for them...

WHY EXHIBIT?

Throughout the world, people with intellectual disabilities are dependent on family carers. This is especially so in childhood, but in most countries their care-giving extends well into adulthood and often for a lifetime. What is remarkable is the exemplary care that most families provide to their much-loved relatives despite having little prior experience of disability or any formal training....

LEARNING DISABILITIES NURSING—IN SEARCH OF A NEW MODEL

Introduction The discipline of learning disabilities nursing has seen scant attempt to explore the concepts underpinning its approach to care. Most recent attempts to do this have focused on the application of concepts identified within other disciplines of the profession, most notably general nursing, which are a product of conceptual analyses within those areas (Duff 1997; Mason and Patterson 1990)....

TAKING PART

NICOLE Based on the long-standing trade union principle that ‘an injury to one is the concern of all’, the Irish Trade Union Trust (ITUT) has been set up and funded by the members of Ireland’s largest union, SIPTU, to develop a social solidarity service for unemployed, retired and disabled members, and to build links between the trade union movement and...

REVIEW: YOUR GOOD HEALTH SERIES

Self-care skills and health education are vital for young people and adults with learning difficulties. However, accessing information which is clear, informative and which promotes these issues can be difficult. The British Institute of Learning Disabilities (BILD) have recently published a series of nine books with the topics/titles: Eating and drinking, Breathe easy, Exercise, Sex, Using medicine safely, Seeing and...

REVIEW: IZZY BAIA

Izzy-Baia offers a chance to enter into the autistic world of Brian O’Connell through the eyes of his carer, Kevin Whelan. It is as much about Kevin as about Brian, and we lear about Kevin’s past—the years he spent in England, a drifting lifestyle. Kevin describes some of the jobs he had before becoming a carer and friend to...

CNEASTA CONFERENCE—BUILDING ON EXPERIENCE

The annual Cneasta Conference was held this year in the Tullamore Court Hotel on 27–28 October with the theme ‘building on experience’. The conference was officially opened by Jacqui Browne, Chairperson of the NRB. Tony Tyrrell, Department of Enterprise, Trade and Employment, updated delegates on national developments and gave a concise overview of the next round of European funding, which...

SIBLINKS GET SERIOUS AS THEY SET THE AGENDA IN THEIR SECOND NATIONAL CONFERENCE

Veronica Cleary, Chairperson, opened the Siblink Conference in UCD on 19 September 1998, attended by approximately sixty delegates. She highlighted the many achievements of the group: siblings, as individuals, had moved from position of no voice, no ear, and no consultation—to establishing a national committee of siblings with a constitution, newsletter, mailing list and mission statement. The double agenda of...

THE MYSTERIES OF LANGUAGE AND CUSTOMS

Vernacular never meant much to me in midwest America where my parochial upbringing led me to believe everyone used English as I did. Despite Easter holidays in Florida, Louisiana, Mississippi, Arkansas or Kentucky, I noticed only the accents and any subtleties of different vernacular escaped my bourgeois upbringing. It wasn’t until I moved to the inner city of Milwaukee to...

THE SCENT OF AN INSTITUTION

I spent six years in an institution. No, I wasn’t an orphan or a delinquent, but in the 1950s and ’60s many middle-class young people were incarcerated during their teenage years—for their own educational good. It wasn’t total incarceration—we got out for holidays, we were allowed controlled visitors and letters. There was no outright cruelty—just emotional neglect and odd nunnish...