Friday, November 24, 2017

Frontline Issue 71

MOTHERING SPECIAL NEEDS

This book is like a gust of wind through the literature involving parents of children with special needs. As Christopher Gillberg, Professor of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, says in his introduction to the book: ‘it should be required reading for all involved in supporting families who struggle with a lifelong disability.’ In her research between 2001 and 2004, Anna...

How do we support people with disabilites to have meaningful lives?

Darcy Elks, from Pennsylvania, came to the Sisters of Charity Services in the Midlands—St Mary’s, Delvin and Moore Abbey, Monasterevin—to meet with stakeholders, parents, service users, staff and managers with a message about inclusive lifestyles in a mainstream society. Darcy has lifelong experience in the process of de. institutionalisation; indeed, she worked as a volunteer in Willowbrook on Staten...

Looking after your breasts

Breast cancer is considered to be one of the most common cancers to affect females. According to Davies and Duff (2001), women who have never given birth have a statistically higher risk of developing breast cancer. Women with an intellectual disability are living longer and in the main do not have children and are therefore considered more at risk...

Creative arts therapies service

An exciting new pilot project has recently been established by the Mountmellick Development Association in collaboration with a wide range of partners. Áthas is a creative arts therapies service delivered in the Laois and Offaly region to persons with a physical, intellectual, emotional, mental health and/or sensory disability. Funded until 2008, under the Enhancing Disability Services Program, the Áthas...

Changing places—changing lives

Changing Places, a new national campaign in the UK, was launched in 2006 by a consortium of disability organisations including charities Mencap and PAMIS. Thousands of people with profound and multiple learning disabilities need ‘Changing Places’ toilets—rooms properly equipped to allow people to use the toilet with assistance or have their continence pads changed. They include an adult-sized, height-adjustable...

Working all the live-long day: Parenting and employment

In recent decades, more and more mothers are entering the work force. This societal change has given rise to a surge of research aimed at measuring how working outside the home affects women’s lives. In this column, we will share some research findings on the complex relationship between employment and parenting. Whether you work outside the home or not,...

The challenges of authentically getting what people actually need on a person-by-person basis

Much attention and energy has been given in recent years to developing new options for people with disabilities that would be more desirable alternatives to group-based services. Naturally, a wide range of terms has arisen to describe these, such as ‘person-centred’, ‘individualised’, ‘personalised’, ‘tailor-made’, ‘self-determined’ and whatnot. In many locations, the rapid adoption of such terms by so many people...

Team Ireland do us proud at Special Olympics World Summer Games

The 2007 Special Olympics World Summer Games in Shanghai ran from 2-11 October. 7200 athletes from 165 nations and regions took part in the Games, which were held for the second time outside of the USA and for the first time in Asia. Of these, 141 athletes, 55 coaches, 200 volunteers and over 400 family members travelled from Ireland,...

Cautionary Tales

Inclusion Ireland’s Annual Parents’ Seminar was held at the Radisson SAS Hotel in Athlone on Saturday, 3 November 2007. During the morning session speakers sought to unravel aspects of ‘supported decision making’—from philosophical to legal. Guest speaker Michael Bach, who is Vice President of the Canadian Association for Community Living (and was formerly Director of Research of the esteemed...

Taking steps towards inclusion: Assessing the attitudes of schoolchildren toward their peers with Down Syndrome

Introduction The social relationships of a child with Down Syndrome or other Special Educational Needs (SEN) often constitute the single area of school life about which parents and carers are most concerned (Cuckle and Wilson 2002). Therefore, it is perhaps not surprising that exposure to peers and opportunities for friendships in the local community are frequently the main reasons why...