Friday, November 24, 2017

Frontline Issue 73

USING INTENSIVE INTERACTION AND SENSORY INTEGRATION

I started reading this book as soon as I saw ‘sensory integration’ in the title and Jane Horwood as paediatric occupational therapist with special interest in the use of sensory integration. ‘Using Intensive Interaction’ itself implies the importance of interaction skills to practise while communicating with autistic children. The author clearly explains the use of body language, in guiding...

SMALL STEPS FORWARD

This book is written by the mother of a child with a range of developmental delays diagnosed as autism. While many children learn and develop spontaneously, often children with special needs require a helping hand. With this in mind the author focuses on the importance of parents knowing the stages of child development within the areas of physical, social,...

Development of a National Research Strategy for intellectual disability 2008–2013

The National Federation of Voluntary Bodies has launched its National Research Strategy. This is the first national intellectual disability research strategy in Ireland. The objective of the Strategy is to develop a vision for the research activities of the NFVB for a six-year timeframe (2008.2013). The principles underpinning this vision are: to undertake research to support the development of high-quality...

Supporting communication in a child with Down Syndrome using augmentative and alternative communication

Introduction There can be little doubt that the use of effective communication has major implications on how individuals can exercise choice and control over their lives, gain independence and social inclusion leading to real improvements in quality of life (Thurman et al. 2003). The core meaning of the word communicate is ‘to place in common’, and language is said to...

Parents supporting parents

Having a child with special needs can be a frightening and lonely experience. SNAP (Special Needs Active Parents) offer support for each other, as we are all families with children who have special needs. We have often asked ourselves, ‘why me?’, ‘what did I do to deserve this?’, ‘who do I go to?’ We don’t have all the answers,...

Creating a dynamic learning environment for children and adolescents with severe and profound intellectual disabilities

I am an experienced special educational needs teacher; currently working in a class catering for five female adolescents assessed with a severe or profound general learning disability (SPGLD) and other disabilities including Autistic Spectrum Disorder, Cerebral Palsy and named syndromes. The way in which students with SPGLD access their learning is unique—each student has differing strengths, needs, characteristics and...

Developing Pastoral Support

The ‘spirit’ is the vital animating essence of a person, and we endeavour to nourish this divine centre of each person we reach out to in our care. The pastoral support team ministry is a vital part of the Sisters of Charity of Jesus and Mary/Muiriosa Foundation organisation’s ethos when addressing the holistic needs of the people in our...

Families and faith communities: the promise and power of the pastoral role

In one of the formative experiences of my life, I was assigned as a young chaplain in training to a part time role at the Center for Disorders of Development and Learning in Chapel Hill, North Carolina. The center provided training for about 13 disciplines of health care professionals, but the chaplaincy role there was brand new. Families came...

Gallery

In this month’s gallery we feature two different exhibitions. The students of the Certificate in Contemporary Living at NIID have their pieces on the first page. Conor and Emma were exploring the concept and practical use of Colláge with particular reference to Picasso and Matisse as sources of inspiration. Michael and Yvonne were using colour and line as a...

Not all good news!

When it was announced that Budget day was being brought forward, speculation began to grow of massive cuts in all sectors. As the economic situation grew dimmer, there was a growing fear that people with an intellectual disability would suffer in an attempt by Government to claw back money for other areas. In response to this fear, Inclusion Ireland...