Monday, September 25, 2017
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Frontline Issue 95
frontline 95

Articles

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by Stephen Kealy

Stephen Kealy

In the past in Ireland, it was not unusual that when a husband died their widow did not always go to the graveyard for the burial. Children, depending on their age, were also often prevented from attending their parent’s funeral. In both situations, well intentioned relatives and friends wanted to minimise their emotional fallout, not realising that active engagement with the grieving was an important part of the process of dealing with loss. This issue of Frontline has the theme of grief and loss in the lives of people with an intellectual disability...

Mary Moran, Labour Seanad Spokesperson on Education, Disability, Equality and Mental Health, on the national finals of Special Olympics Ireland.

Dundalk Special Olympics team with their medals on return to Dundalk

“Let me win- But if I cannot, let me be brave in the attempt”. This was the motto repeated by 1,500 athletes throughout Limerick between 12 – 15th June at the national finals of Special Olympics Ireland...

Fiona Duignan, Policy & Project Manager, Inclusion Ireland

Inclusion Ireland hosted its annual conference and AGM at the Radisson Blu, Limerick, on 10 May 2014. Over 150 delegates were in attendance and attended three workshops. The workshops were all facilitated or supported by Inclusion Ireland staff and focussed on the following topics: Self Advocacy, HSE Reform Programme which covered, Progressing Children’s Disability Services, New Directions and Congregated Settings and the final workshop was on Assisted Decision Making...

by Geraldine Meagher

Recently the Special Olympic were held in Limerick hosted by the University of Limerick. This short article traces the event for a boy with severe intellectual disability (Joe Kelly) and his Special Olympics trainer (Geraldine Meagher). Geraldine works in Scoil Aonghusa in Cashel, Co. Tipperary, teaching sport and swimming to students with intellectual disability...

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Petria Malone on the growing concerns of the disability parental groups in the Midlands over lack of access to services

A new and favourable precedent was set on 4 March, 2014, as three parent groups came together to meet with the Midlands HSE Disability Services. Members of the Laois Offaly Families for Autism (LOFFA), the Offaly Association for People with Intellectual Disability (Offaly ID), and Offaly Down Syndrome Association joined forces to forge communication...

Siobhán Long, Manager, Enable Ireland National Assistive Technology Training Service, gives an overview of assistive technology

Where would we be without technology these days? It drives so much of what we do: whether it’s how we want TV (on demand, Netflix, and other streaming services take up as much of our attention as terrestrial TV stations), listen to the radio (internet/digital radio anyone?), keep in touch with one another, or plan our daily work schedules....

Geraldine Moran explains ‘Actions in Video’ a unique app she developed not only for speech and language therapists and teachers but also for parents and tutors.

The past few years have seen a revolution in the use of mobile technology. Phones, iPads, tablets … one can hardly keep up with the latest gadget. With the introduction of these devices and a myriad of apps, we are provided with a new method of learning that is both beneficial and challenging for those with communication needs...

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Sarah Lennon, Inclusion Ireland, writes that making a will is always important—even more so for the parents of those with an Intellectual Disability

Planning for the future can be a very difficult and worrying thing to do. Planning for a future after you have gone can be one of the most difficult and upsetting tasks of all. It is no surprise that many people delay thinking about making a will, but delaying and ultimately failing to make a will can have serious consequences for your family, especially if you have a family member with an intellectual disability...

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Máiríde Woods shares her experience of losing her daughter, Aoife

It is hard to write about grief and loss because they are private and individual experiences, even in a world where most things are public. Occasionally grief becomes public, as in the reactions to Princess Diana’s death which ended up expressing people’s sorrow at their own losses...

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Linda McEnhill explains that a good LSB will offer the essential elements of communication, information giving, identity building and attention giving to those with an intellectual disability.

Background: Described by Fahlberg as ‘...an account of a child’s [person’s] life in words, pictures, photographs and documents, made by the child [person] with the help of a trusted friend [helper]’ (Fahlberg 2012), life story books (LSBs) originated in adoption and fostering services as a tool to build the child’s sense of personal identity, and thereby to support their ability to deal with crisis and change...