Friday, November 24, 2017

Frontline Issue 96

WALKING: A SOLUTION TO INACTIVITY FOR PEOPLE WITH INTELLECTUAL DISABILITY

Research suggests that although the health of people with ID has improved over the past 30 years, they still have higher rates of both primary and secondary medical conditions, undiagnosed diseases and unmet health needs compared to the non-ID population (McCarron et al. 2011). One of the most significant current discussions in intellectual disability concerns the health risks from inactivity which lead to increase risk factors for non-communicable diseases such as type-2 diabetes and heart disease (Taggart and Cousins 2014). People with ID do not meet current physical activity guidelines and have high inactivity and poor fitness (Phillip and Holland 2011). Along with low rates of physical activity, poor diet and secondary health conditions contain their abilities to be active (RCN 2011)...

EXPLORING THE NATURE OF RESPITE CARE IN INTELLECTUAL DISABILITY

Over 5600 people with intellectual disabilities (ID) in Ireland use a form of respite each yeaer (Health Research Board 2011). Although respite provision in Ireland has substantially increased over the past 16 years, it is projected that an additional 1211 individuals will require respite from 2012 to 2016. The Department of Health reported that 8000 individuals received centre-based respite in 2009, with a total pay cost of e52 million, and a total estimated cost of e70-2 million. They suggested that alternative models of respite care might be more cost-effective than the centre-based respite method (Department of Health (2012) Value for money and policy review of disability services in Ireland). The policy and empirical literature explicitly states the need to increase the availability of respite, and carers of individuals with ID commonly request this resource...

AsIAm

‘Back to School’ is a stressful time for many students and their families, with the competing financial, academic and emotional demands. However it can be particularly challenging for students on the Autism Spectrum. Students with Autism need routine, struggle with many sensory environments and can find it hard to communicate or socially interact with their teachers or fellow students...

THE EFFECTS OF BULLYING: A CAUTIONARY TALE

I recently learned about the devastating and continuing effects that a friend’s cyber bullying has had for a woman and her whole family. Several years ago, Susan (not her real name) began to complain about ‘not nice’ texts and online messages she was receiving from a longtime friend (here called Anne). Both young women have moderate intellectual disabilities. Her mother suggested that Susan should delete the messages and tell Anne that she didn’t like them. But the problem persisted to Susan’s growing distress. Eventually her parents saw some of the vindictive emails, and belittling, taunting texts and voice messages...

Inclusion Ireland News

Following on from the success of Inclusion Ireland’s training calendar earlier in the year, we will be launching an Autumn/Winter calendar from September to January. Popular topics such as Making a Will, Decision Making, Finances, HIQA Standards, Advocacy and Sexual Relationships will be included. We will also beginning Media Training for people interested in this area. As with all of Inclusion Ireland’s training, members enjoy preferential rates and first option to book over members of the public. The training will be taking place across Ireland and more information will be posted on www.inclusionireland.ie/content/page/training and via our Facebook and Twitter pages.

ACCESS TO MEDICAL CARDS AND LONGTERM ILLNESS SCHEME

Access to healthcare and medicines is an important, and sometimes worrying, issue for people with intellectual disabilities. The introduction and subsequent increases in the prescription charge for medical card prescriptions is controversial and runs the risk of those in financial difficulty not being able to afford vital medicines. This could pose serious problems for those with intellectual disabilities who...

EDITORIAL

Stephen Kealy
Intellectual disability is a well-researched field of study, generating a considerable number of references in any Google search. What is always challenging is converting research to practice. There is also considerable work completed on the added value to the person with an intellectual disability moving from institutional settings to live in the community, as well as the importance of keeping housing solutions—as far as possible—individualised, to maximise the benefits for the person. Yet some services supported by the HSE have paid insufficient attention to what is known to work for people seeking a better life with all the added benefits for their health and wellbeing...

Pathways to Inclusion: 4th International Association for the Scientific Study of Intellectual and Developmental Disability [IASSIDD] Europe Congress (part one)

IASSIDD is the premier scientific grouping that is dedicated to researching, and thereby improving, the lives of people with intellectual and developmental disability. Various conferences are hosted by IASSIDD each year, but the ones most frequented by European and Irish researchers are the World Congress and the European Congress. The former takes place every four years (next due in...

LETTER to the editor

Dear Frontline editor, Thanks for another great edition of Frontline. I am particularly interested in the article on Bone issues and would like to draw attention to this online article (http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1751722214000997) which states: “A greater proportion of individuals with intellectual disability experience health problems compared to the general population. Yet individuals with intellectual disability receive comparatively lower levels of preventative...

Pathways to Inclusion: 4th International Association for the Scientific Study of Intellectual and Developmental Disability [IASSIDD] Europe Congress (part TWo)

The International Association for the Scientific Study of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (IASSIDD) held its Europe Regional Congress at the University of Vienna on 14-17 July 2014. The congress was attended by people from all over Europe and further afield, including Australia, the US and Canada. People with disabilities and people without disabilities were welcome to attend. A number...