Friday, April 28, 2017
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Lorraine Ledger outlines the beginning, development and success of a novel approach to creating an educational resource about bone health, dealing with causes, risks, screening and prevention for bone issues, a considerable concern for people with an Intellectual Disability.

The Irish Longitudinal study on Ageing – Intellectual Disability Services (TILDA-IDS) Wave II report (2014) highlighted that osteoporosis is the most common non-cardiovascular disease among the Intellectual Disability (ID) population, higher than arthritis, cancers and respiratory conditions.

How to avoid loneliness in older people with an Intellectual Disability, by Andrew Wormald

What are the circumstances in a person’s life that best help them avoid or overcome loneliness? For some people as they age loneliness is an ever-present risk. Mounting losses to social resources and deterioration in health increase the risk of experiencing loneliness.

Lorraine Keating and Eilish Burke sought to help people with an intellectual disability to take better care of their own health, using a number of innovative methods…

The importance of health and well-being is paramount to having a good quality of life. However, to stay healthy and happy into old age, and to experience good life quality you have to be an active participant in your own health.

Lessons from IDS TILDA by Kev Mac Giolla Phádraig.

Together, tooth decay and gum disease lead to tooth loss and oral disability. In Ireland, about a third of older adults with ID have no teeth; a rate twice as common as in the general population. What is worse is that when older persons with ID lose all their teeth, they are very unlikely to have.....

Deirdre Corby has sent in details to Frontline Magazine Ireland of a new programme launching in Dublin City University for people with an Intellectual Disability and others with in the field…

The School of Nursing & Human Sciences, DCU are launching a new programme in the area of relationships and sexuality for people with an Intellectual Disability. It is open to all

a horse

Including one or more horses as part of a treatment team may seem very 21st century, but the concept has been around for a very long time. In the 5th century BC, Hippocrates, the 'father of medicine' spoke of the horse as a healer, and throughout history we find many references to the physical and emotional benefits of having horses in your life.

Jerome Corby argues that the disability sector in Ireland needs a strong voice at the government table, in order to ensure people with disabilities are adequately supported and resourced as the Irish economy emerges from recession.

As we approach the possibility of a government being formed, it’s worth reflecting on what is required of a new Health ministry with responsibility for improving the lives of people with disability and their families.

Mei Lin Yap’s latest column details her ambitions for the Open European Swimming Championships in November, her greatest inspirations, and what motivates her drive for success.

Mei-Lin-Yap

My ambition is to become a champion in swimming. I haven’t competed in a few years now so I am just coming back to the swimming again. This ambition is the motivation that I need to keep me driven to achieve this goal; I know this is a really big goal, but I am prepared to put in the hard work to achieve it.

Registered Intellectual Disability Nurses (RNID’s) are unique, being the only group of professionals who are educated solely to work with people with an intellectual disability (ID) (Northway et al 2006). This specialised education is only available in Ireland and the UK. RNIDs work in a wide range of settings, and have a diversity of roles and skills (one of which is care planning)

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Dr Jane Tracy, Centre for Developmental Disability Health, Victoria, Australia, says that many people with intellectual disabilities often encounter barriers to accessing healthcare services

Being healthy is more than not being sick. Being healthy is about feeling well and comfortable, safe and secure, to be able to connect with other people and join in the life of your community. Being healthy is about feeling good physically and mentally. For people with intellectual and other disabilities it is very important to be and stay as healthy as possible, as being unwell makes it harder to do things for yourself, and to join in education, work, recreation and social activities with family and friends. Many people with intellectual disabilities experience poor health. Some of the health issues relate to the disability, but many are the same as those experienced by the general population.