Friday, April 28, 2017
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In May, Mary de Paor attended the seminar on Personal Budgets and individualized funding held in Dublin. Here she reviews the various contributions by a number of experts from Ireland and the United Kingdom...

Inclusion Ireland and Down Syndrome Ireland hosted a seminar on ‘Personal Budgets’ at the Gibson Hotel in Dublin, on the morning of 30 May 2016. The conference room was bulging with people with disabilities and family members who were anxious to hear about new/better ways to access the supports they need and want in order to achieve greater choice and independence.

Deirdre Corby introduces HIQA‘s new guide and leaflet, designed to support people who use services in making their own decisions about their lives.

HIQA have published a new guide called Supporting people’s autonomy: a guidance document, and also a separate explanatory leaflet called My Choices: My Autonomy. The reason for putting this guide together was to help support people who use services to make their own choices and decisions about their lives.

Niamh McEnerney, member of the Dublin Mid Leinster (DML) End-of-Life Sub-Group, shares her findings from her research, which asked the question: What are the end-of-life needs of Adults with Intellectual Disability?

Ireland’s independent health safety, quality and accountability regulatory body, The Health Information & Quality Authority (HIQA) published the National Standards for Residential Services for Children and Adults with Disabilities in 2013. Within these standards, the need for appropriate end-of-life care for adults with Intellectual Disability (ID) was highlighted.

Jeanette McCallion welcomes movement towards a community-based social care model, but cautions that complex medical needs among people with intellectual disability still require medical services, previously provided in congregated settings, to be maintained and improved in this environment.

Jeanette and Cliona

In December last I watched RTE’s Primetime Investigates on Áras Attracta, Bungalow 3. Knowing in advance that the footage would be bad, I debated with myself whether I should make myself watch it or not. The main reason for my unease is that my seventeen year old sister Cliona has profound ID as well as an extreme epilepsy syndrome that no seizure drug has ever been able to influence.

Registered Intellectual Disability Nurses (RNID’s) are unique, being the only group of professionals who are educated solely to work with people with an intellectual disability (ID) (Northway et al 2006). This specialised education is only available in Ireland and the UK. RNIDs work in a wide range of settings, and have a diversity of roles and skills (one of which is care planning)

Kathleen Lynch, TD, Minister for primary Care, Social Care (Disabilities/older people) and Mental Health introduces Frontline's first e-publication and in doing so addresses the issues of Standards, Regulation and Quality of life.

Kathleen-Lynch-TD

People with disabilities should be given the opportunity to live as full a life as possible and to live with their families, and as part of their communities, for as long as possible. Every person who uses our disability services and our services for older people, is entitled to expect and receive supports of the highest standard and to live in an atmosphere of safety and care.

by Maura O'Loughlin, Quality, Compliance & Training Manager, Sunbeam House Services

Support services for people with disabilities have focused a significant amount of time, energy, and resources, over the past 16 months adjusting to a regulatory environment. The Health Information & Quality Authority (HIQA) has been inspecting services for people with disabilities since November 2013. All agencies must be registered within a three-year timeframe that commenced in 2013...

Joe Wolfe takes a critical look at the effects of a more stringent approach to the application of standards and regulation in services for people with intellectual disabilities.

The Health Information and Quality Authority (HIQA) is the statutory authority with responsibility for registering and inspecting residential services for people with disabilities in Ireland. The regulations for residential services were enacted in 2013. Inspections have commenced with a number of services having undergone registration inspections, while some have had monitoring inspections and others have undergone both types of inspection...