Monday, December 11, 2017

HSE

Personal Budgets Conference – a review

Inclusion Ireland and Down Syndrome Ireland hosted a seminar on ‘Personal Budgets’ at the Gibson Hotel in Dublin, on the morning of 30 May 2016. The conference room was bulging with people with disabilities and family members who were anxious to hear about new/better ways to access the supports they need and want in order to achieve greater choice and independence.

Government 2016: Split responsibilities – free up resources

As we approach the possibility of a government being formed, it’s worth reflecting on what is required of a new Health ministry with responsibility for improving the lives of people with disability and their families.

Individualised Funding in Ireland: Identifying and Implementing Lessons from Elsewhere

Traditionally, public funds allocated for people with a disability have been distributed among service providers to deliver a suite of services to meet all personal, health and social care needs. However, recent years have seen a greater emphasis on, and attendant policy shift toward, what has been called individualised funding. I

Provision of Autism Services Leaving Much To Be Desired

My daughter Francesca has autism and graduated from St Paul’s Special School in June of this year. In 2013, I had contacted our local Disability Manager. She told me that the school and the family would have to identify a service that best suited her needs....

‘Decongregated Settings’ – Hailed as progress, but seems to forget those with complex medical needs

Jeanette and Cliona
In December last I watched RTE’s Primetime Investigates on Áras Attracta, Bungalow 3. Knowing in advance that the footage would be bad, I debated with myself whether I should make myself watch it or not. The main reason for my unease is that my seventeen year old sister Cliona has profound ID as well as an extreme epilepsy syndrome that no seizure drug has ever been able to influence.

A MESSAGE TO FRONTLINE READERS: Quality of Life, Standards, and Regulation.

Kathleen-Lynch-TD
People with disabilities should be given the opportunity to live as full a life as possible and to live with their families, and as part of their communities, for as long as possible. Every person who uses our disability services and our services for older people, is entitled to expect and receive supports of the highest standard and to live in an atmosphere of safety and care.

SQUEEZED BY Giants: HIQA AND THE HSE

Like many parents from the intellectual disability area, I welcomed the coming of HIQA. I thought it would provide useful oversight of services, safeguard people’s rights and provide an independent arbiter for complaints. What I didn’t foresee was another blanket of bureaucracy...

QUALITY OF LIFE: What does it mean when your child has Autism?

Kyle
Quality of Life can mean a lot of things to society as a whole. For most people, it means a good job, nice house and car, family and money for luxuries, and then you are pretty much all set - right?...

POLICIES AND PREDICAMENTS

In the last twenty-five years, many hefty tomes of policy documents have been published in the arena of intellectual disabilities in Ireland—from Needs and abilities (1990), A strategy for equality (1996) to A time to move on from congregated settings (2011) and New directions (2012).