Friday, November 24, 2017

Independence

My life as a Ward of Court

Claire Hendrick speaking about her experience at Inclusion Ireland AGM 2016 My mother died and the house we had lived in all my life was sold. I have an intellectual disability and people didn’t think I was able to make my own decisions. There was no way in law for me to have support to make decisions and so I was made a Ward of Court under the Lunacy Act of 1871.....

My journey to supported independent living.

People have always told me, “Life’s not meant to be easy!” Well, I’ve learnt that to be true... absolutely true. Let me tell you, much of my life has been a very difficult struggle. From the days I can first remember right up to now. Everything I’ve ever had, I’ve had to fight for. And it never stops.

LIVING A GOOD LIFE IN YOUR OWN HOME

With Ireland still to ratify the United Nations Convention on the Rights of People with Disabilities, Errol Cocks explores Individual Supported Living and lays out the Australian experience of a person-centred approach to Individualised Funding, identifying the importance of controlling its best use via people with disabilities and their families, and reducing the influence of government / NGOs.

Re-location, re-shuffle, re-institutionalisation?

National housing policy for people with disabilities promotes the move from large residential settings to community-based living (with four people the recommended maximum number sharing the same residence).

Making Decisions and Independent Living

Before you leave the house every day, you have already made numerous decisions. You have chosen when to get up, you have chosen whether or not to brush your teeth, you’ve chosen what to wear, and you’ve chosen what to eat for breakfast. Without realising, you have made a significant amount of decisions.

THE NEXT NEW DEAL – A BASIC INCOME FOR ALL

Back in the 1930’s, The New Deal was an imaginative but wholly necessary series of programmes enacted in America between 1933 and 1938. They were inspired and enacted by Franklin D. Roosevelt

Lesson from the courtroom: attitudes to parents with intellectual disabilities in childcare proceedings

In late 2015, the Child Law Project published its final report. This was a three- year project, where the team of lawyers and academics, led by journalist Carol Coulter, sat in on over 1,200 child care cases.

Parents and parenting with intellectual disabilities: Messages from research

In the early part of the 20th century, persons with intellectual disabilities found themselves treated as social pariahs. By some accounts, the ‘feeble-minded’ were moral degenerates and the root cause of society’s ills. Allowing them to reproduce was for many, at that time, unthinkable.

My Life, My Way – Reflections from an Individualised living arrangement

Fran and Molly
As a thirty-five-year-old woman I’m about to celebrate my first year as a home owner. I now have a front door and a place that reflects who I am. A place I call my own. Most importantly I have a home that allows me to feel safe and to grow as a person....

Assisted Decision Making – Implications of the Legislation

The Assisted-Decision Making Act is now the law of the land, so we have a bit of a wait until the law comes into force later this year - enabling us all some time to get our heads around the implications of the new law and how it will practically change all of our lives.