Tuesday, November 21, 2017

Oral Health

The Importance of oral health for people with ID as they Age

Together, tooth decay and gum disease lead to tooth loss and oral disability. In Ireland, about a third of older adults with ID have no teeth; a rate twice as common as in the general population. What is worse is that when older persons with ID lose all their teeth, they are very unlikely to have.....

OVERCOMING CHALLENGES IN DENTAL CARE

Dental care can be challenging for anyone, with phobia of visits to the dentist being very common and understandably so—dental surgeries can be intimidating places, with unfamiliar people, noises and equipment. For those with intellectual disability, it is important to make dental visits as easy as possible so that phobia or fear does not develop...

PREVENTATIVE TREATMENT AND MAINTAINING ORAL HEALTH

Prevention is the focus for all patients, regardless of any disability present. The best way to thwart disease is to be aware of its causes and how to avoid or minimise them. As regards the mouth, the two main problems which afflict patients are dental decay and gum disease...

ORAL HEALTH: BACK TO BASICS—BRUSHING FOR BEGINNERS, EXPERTS AND EVERYONE IN BETWEEN

David O’Connor, who attends Prosper Fingal services, and works as check-out support in Supervalu Malahide on Fridays, receives advice on minding his teeth. David is a keen sports person who enjoys golf and swimming.
Caring for our own mouths is a challenge—but for the mouths of others, even more so. Carers, family members, hospital workers and parents can all be called upon to look after the teeth and gums of those in their care and usually very little training is provided as regards this intimate task. Cooperation can be varied, and knowledge about...