Monday, March 27, 2017
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From a Service perspective what would make a difference?

When people ask us as what we do as workers in services for people with Intellectual disability, in general we explain our role as ‘supporting’. That’s what we do; we support people in every area of their lives, ‘from cradle to grave’. We want people to do normal things, to attend school, to socialise, to work, and overall to participate fully in their communities.

What are the possibilities for people with intellectual disabilities and family members being involved in the design and development of intellectual disability services into the future? Richard Jackson, Lecturer in Intellectual Disability Nursing in Dublin City University

I have a real interest in services for people with intellectual disabilities growing into their full potential. Over the last while I have been asking the following question: What if an intellectual disability service could find a way to capture all of the voices involved in it ...

Values matter. Values shape our behaviour, attitudes and choices. Values influence the priorities of organisations and how organisations go about their business. We need organisations that are committed to equality and human rights and that prioritise values of dignity, inclusion, autonomy, democracy and social justice. Such organisations would relate in a better manner to people, benefit the full diversity of people to whom they provide services, and offer a better environment for all their staff.  The new statutory duty on public bodies to have regard to the need to eliminate discrimination, promote equality and protect human rights could be the stimulus for the emergence of just such organisations.

Values seem a bit of a luxury item when compared to the struggles of day-to-day living. They are something we should be concerned about, but maybe when we have a bit more time. Yet, whether we attend to them or not, values are shaping how we think, the choices we make, and how we behave. Values matter.

General Election 2016 is just around the corner, and the question was put to the Living Skills Group in Trinity College Dublin to see what their thoughts were on the issues to be brought to the attention of our politicians as they seek our votes...

This was the question asked to a group of people with intellectual disabilities doing a course in Independent Living Skills in The Discipline of Occupational Therapy, Trinity College Dublin. They live with either their family or in a hostel, or in their own apartments.

Sara Porzio details the work involved in sourcing a suitable autism day service for her daughter, and the disappointment in finding it removed at the last minute. She questions whether the health service values all people equally.

My daughter Francesca has autism and graduated from St Paul’s Special School in June of this year. In 2013, I had contacted our local Disability Manager. She told me that the school and the family would have to identify a service that best suited her needs....

Niamh McEnerney, member of the Dublin Mid Leinster (DML) End-of-Life Sub-Group, shares her findings from her research, which asked the question: What are the end-of-life needs of Adults with Intellectual Disability?

Ireland’s independent health safety, quality and accountability regulatory body, The Health Information & Quality Authority (HIQA) published the National Standards for Residential Services for Children and Adults with Disabilities in 2013. Within these standards, the need for appropriate end-of-life care for adults with Intellectual Disability (ID) was highlighted.

Jeanette McCallion welcomes movement towards a community-based social care model, but cautions that complex medical needs among people with intellectual disability still require medical services, previously provided in congregated settings, to be maintained and improved in this environment.

Jeanette and Cliona

In December last I watched RTE’s Primetime Investigates on Áras Attracta, Bungalow 3. Knowing in advance that the footage would be bad, I debated with myself whether I should make myself watch it or not. The main reason for my unease is that my seventeen year old sister Cliona has profound ID as well as an extreme epilepsy syndrome that no seizure drug has ever been able to influence.