Tuesday, November 21, 2017

Services

Irish Criminal Justice and Disability Network

The Irish Criminal Justice and Disability Network (ICJDN) is a recently established organisation. Its aim is to provide a national platform whereby disability organisations and criminal justice agencies can be facilitated to improve ....

Provision of Autism Services Leaving Much To Be Desired

My daughter Francesca has autism and graduated from St Paul’s Special School in June of this year. In 2013, I had contacted our local Disability Manager. She told me that the school and the family would have to identify a service that best suited her needs....

End-of-life: What are the needs of Adults with Intellectual Disability?

Ireland’s independent health safety, quality and accountability regulatory body, The Health Information & Quality Authority (HIQA) published the National Standards for Residential Services for Children and Adults with Disabilities in 2013. Within these standards, the need for appropriate end-of-life care for adults with Intellectual Disability (ID) was highlighted.

‘Decongregated Settings’ – Hailed as progress, but seems to forget those with complex medical needs

Jeanette and Cliona
In December last I watched RTE’s Primetime Investigates on Áras Attracta, Bungalow 3. Knowing in advance that the footage would be bad, I debated with myself whether I should make myself watch it or not. The main reason for my unease is that my seventeen year old sister Cliona has profound ID as well as an extreme epilepsy syndrome that no seizure drug has ever been able to influence.

Nursing Frameworks of Care for Intellectual Disability Nursing – an overview

Registered Intellectual Disability Nurses (RNID’s) are unique, being the only group of professionals who are educated solely to work with people with an intellectual disability (ID) (Northway et al 2006). This specialised education is only available in Ireland and the UK. RNIDs work in a wide range of settings, and have a diversity of roles and skills (one of which is care planning)

A MESSAGE TO FRONTLINE READERS: Quality of Life, Standards, and Regulation.

Kathleen-Lynch-TD
People with disabilities should be given the opportunity to live as full a life as possible and to live with their families, and as part of their communities, for as long as possible. Every person who uses our disability services and our services for older people, is entitled to expect and receive supports of the highest standard and to live in an atmosphere of safety and care.

WALKing the Walk: One Student’s Journey to Achieving His Potential

Meet Stephen Lyons, a student at the Institute of Technology Tallaght (ITT) who has travelled his own unique and difficult path towards achieving his goal of attending college and further developing his passion and skills in the area of Creative Digital Media. Stephen is highly regarded by his fellow students and lecturers alike and is described as being an active, contributing and popular student.

A review of the initial phase of regulation

The most welcome feature of regulation its zero tolerance of what should not be tolerated. A comprehensive 18-outcome inspection immediately surfaces all of the legacy issues which have accumulated and compacted over years – the kind of arrangements which everybody knew were inappropriate, unacceptable; arrangements often euphemistically described as “not being ideal” or “sub-optimal.”...

The Bigger Picture: The Quality, Compliance, & Regulation Agenda 2015

Support services for people with disabilities have focused a significant amount of time, energy, and resources, over the past 16 months adjusting to a regulatory environment. The Health Information & Quality Authority (HIQA) has been inspecting services for people with disabilities since November 2013. All agencies must be registered within a three-year timeframe that commenced in 2013...

Has Regulation of Residential Settings Improved The Standards and Quality of Life of People with Disabilities? A provisional view

The Health Information and Quality Authority (HIQA) is the statutory authority with responsibility for registering and inspecting residential services for people with disabilities in Ireland. The regulations for residential services were enacted in 2013. Inspections have commenced with a number of services having undergone registration inspections, while some have had monitoring inspections and others have undergone both types of inspection...