Tuesday, November 21, 2017

Services

SQUEEZED BY Giants: HIQA AND THE HSE

Like many parents from the intellectual disability area, I welcomed the coming of HIQA. I thought it would provide useful oversight of services, safeguard people’s rights and provide an independent arbiter for complaints. What I didn’t foresee was another blanket of bureaucracy...

QUALITY OF LIFE: What does it mean when your child has Autism?

Kyle
Quality of Life can mean a lot of things to society as a whole. For most people, it means a good job, nice house and car, family and money for luxuries, and then you are pretty much all set - right?...

Something meaningful to do every day should be a right enshrined in law

Youth unemployment in Ireland is currently over 22 percent, and Irish parents are heartbroken watching their young adult sons and daughters emigrate to far away shores for work as there is nothing here for them. As difficult as this is, these young people are, in my opinion, lucky as they are able to emigrate and find a meaningful occupation elsewhere...

FEAR OF THE FILE: Psychotherapy and Adults with Intellectual Disabilities in modern Ireland

I have been lucky enough as a psychotherapist in private practice to work with a lot of men and women who have intellectual disabilities and this opening quote has come from that work. Something that is continually coming up for my clients in recent times is their ‘fear of the file’ and the desire to have it destroyed by any means possible...

A TIME TO ENGAGE

Stephen Kealy
Consumer protection is valued by any person purchasing a product or service, and the supporting legislation is robust. Essentially, consumer legislation is there to protect the public from shoddy goods, services and practices...

Community Intellectual Disability Psychiatry provision in Ireland; a service description

Psychiatry input to people with intellectual disability in Ireland is provided mostly by the voluntary and non-statutory sector as described by the white paper A Vision for Change (Department of Health and Children 2006) alongside some statutory provision. This paper describes one such community voluntary sector service provision for County Galway.

GET A LIFE

There has been a dramatic change in what services for people with intellectual disability look like in an Irish context. In the Irish Midlands, since 2000, a transfer programme has attempted to vigorously improve people’s lives through the closure of large congregated institutions. The objective was to get people with intellectual disability out of hospital settings and into community-based homes where smaller groups of people with intellectual would co-reside...

THE NEXT STEPS PROJECT

The Next Steps Project is a community of learning facilitating the movement to a more individual approach to supporting people. It is working with people themselves, their families and service providers to support people with intellectual disabilities in Ireland to achieve greater independence and full active citizenship...

WHAT’S NEW IN SERVICES FOR PEOPLE WITH LEARNING DISABILITIES?

People with learning disabilities have many different needs for services. In recent years a wider range of services have become available to them and their families. But unlike bad tidings, good news doesn’t travel all that fast or that far. This prompted the Eastern Health and Social Services Board in Northern Ireland to launch a ‘What’s New?’ initiative. This...

Caring for people with intellectual disabilities: the need for residential care

A recent Irish study (Egan, A. 1997 Caring for people with intellectual disabilities: the need for residential care. Irish Medical Journal 90 (8).) shows that people with intellectual disabilities who are highly dependent and who have challenging behaviour are most in need of residential and day services. While most health boards have long waiting lists for residential and day...