Monday, September 25, 2017
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Defining supervision is a rather complex task, writes Jenna Doogan. “The struggle to define supervision reflects a growing recognition of how complex the supervisory process is”. Benefiel and Holton, (2010).

Not so long ago I conducted a piece of research to explore and investigate supervisors’ and managers’ experiences of supervision in the workplace in Not-for-Profit organisations. According to Share and McElwee, p163 (2005), professional supervision is a partnership process of ongoing reflection and feedback between a named supervisor and supervisee to ensure and enhance effective practice.

Niamh McEnerney, member of the Dublin Mid Leinster (DML) End-of-Life Sub-Group, shares her findings from her research, which asked the question: What are the end-of-life needs of Adults with Intellectual Disability?

Ireland’s independent health safety, quality and accountability regulatory body, The Health Information & Quality Authority (HIQA) published the National Standards for Residential Services for Children and Adults with Disabilities in 2013. Within these standards, the need for appropriate end-of-life care for adults with Intellectual Disability (ID) was highlighted.

Sarah Lennon assesses the progress of the proposed capacity legislation, and previews the impact that legislation will have on decision-making for people with an intellectual disability

For those who have campaigned for modern capacity law through the years, there was an important milestone recently. The Assisted Decision-Making (Capacity) Bill 2013 progressed through select committee stage – which is the third stage in a five-stage process of making law. Stages 4 and 5, called report and final stage respectively, are normally seen as procedural and there is genuine optimism that the end of the road is in sight.

Kathleen Lynch, TD, Minister for primary Care, Social Care (Disabilities/older people) and Mental Health introduces Frontline's first e-publication and in doing so addresses the issues of Standards, Regulation and Quality of life.

Kathleen-Lynch-TD

People with disabilities should be given the opportunity to live as full a life as possible and to live with their families, and as part of their communities, for as long as possible. Every person who uses our disability services and our services for older people, is entitled to expect and receive supports of the highest standard and to live in an atmosphere of safety and care.

The most welcome feature of regulation its zero tolerance of what should not be tolerated. A comprehensive 18-outcome inspection immediately surfaces all of the legacy issues which have accumulated and compacted over years – the kind of arrangements which everybody knew were inappropriate, unacceptable; arrangements often euphemistically described as “not being ideal” or “sub-optimal.”...

by Maura O'Loughlin, Quality, Compliance & Training Manager, Sunbeam House Services

Support services for people with disabilities have focused a significant amount of time, energy, and resources, over the past 16 months adjusting to a regulatory environment. The Health Information & Quality Authority (HIQA) has been inspecting services for people with disabilities since November 2013. All agencies must be registered within a three-year timeframe that commenced in 2013...

Joe Wolfe takes a critical look at the effects of a more stringent approach to the application of standards and regulation in services for people with intellectual disabilities.

The Health Information and Quality Authority (HIQA) is the statutory authority with responsibility for registering and inspecting residential services for people with disabilities in Ireland. The regulations for residential services were enacted in 2013. Inspections have commenced with a number of services having undergone registration inspections, while some have had monitoring inspections and others have undergone both types of inspection...