Saturday, July 22, 2017
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Defining supervision is a rather complex task, writes Jenna Doogan. “The struggle to define supervision reflects a growing recognition of how complex the supervisory process is”. Benefiel and Holton, (2010).

Not so long ago I conducted a piece of research to explore and investigate supervisors’ and managers’ experiences of supervision in the workplace in Not-for-Profit organisations. According to Share and McElwee, p163 (2005), professional supervision is a partnership process of ongoing reflection and feedback between a named supervisor and supervisee to ensure and enhance effective practice.

In this opinion piece, David Quinn, Managing Director of Pascal Software, Board member of Inclusion Ireland and member of the Social Democrat party, has taken a close look at the current Irish taxation system. Here he offers a view of a different way of doing it, to be more equitable and eliminate the poverty trap for low-income earners, which could benefit people at all levels of society, including people with disabilities...

Back in the 1930’s, The New Deal was an imaginative but wholly necessary series of programmes enacted in America between 1933 and 1938. They were inspired and enacted by Franklin D. Roosevelt

What are the possibilities for people with intellectual disabilities and family members being involved in the design and development of intellectual disability services into the future? Richard Jackson, Lecturer in Intellectual Disability Nursing in Dublin City University

I have a real interest in services for people with intellectual disabilities growing into their full potential. Over the last while I have been asking the following question: What if an intellectual disability service could find a way to capture all of the voices involved in it ...

Adrian Noonan, self-advocate PRO at Inclusion Ireland, wishes for greater awareness of the needs of people with intellectual disabilities at all levels of the democratic process.

People with Intellectual disabilities are not supported or encouraged to register to vote, or to vote, in Ireland by government or their agencies, who can set up and organise, advertise and have training workshops around the country. This could be done with the help and support of disability advocacy organisations.

Paul Alford shows the possibilities for decision-making and living an independent life in the community, available to people with disabilities with a positive attitude and support from helpful people.

Paul Alford

My name is Paul Alford. I have worked for Inclusion Ireland for the last ten years as a self-advocate. I believe in rights for all people with intellectual disabilities. I believe all people should live as independently as possible .....

Sara Porzio details the work involved in sourcing a suitable autism day service for her daughter, and the disappointment in finding it removed at the last minute. She questions whether the health service values all people equally.

My daughter Francesca has autism and graduated from St Paul’s Special School in June of this year. In 2013, I had contacted our local Disability Manager. She told me that the school and the family would have to identify a service that best suited her needs....

Niamh McEnerney, member of the Dublin Mid Leinster (DML) End-of-Life Sub-Group, shares her findings from her research, which asked the question: What are the end-of-life needs of Adults with Intellectual Disability?

Ireland’s independent health safety, quality and accountability regulatory body, The Health Information & Quality Authority (HIQA) published the National Standards for Residential Services for Children and Adults with Disabilities in 2013. Within these standards, the need for appropriate end-of-life care for adults with Intellectual Disability (ID) was highlighted.