Monday, December 11, 2017

Support

End-of-life: What are the needs of Adults with Intellectual Disability?

Ireland’s independent health safety, quality and accountability regulatory body, The Health Information & Quality Authority (HIQA) published the National Standards for Residential Services for Children and Adults with Disabilities in 2013. Within these standards, the need for appropriate end-of-life care for adults with Intellectual Disability (ID) was highlighted.

‘Decongregated Settings’ – Hailed as progress, but seems to forget those with complex medical needs

Jeanette and Cliona
In December last I watched RTE’s Primetime Investigates on Áras Attracta, Bungalow 3. Knowing in advance that the footage would be bad, I debated with myself whether I should make myself watch it or not. The main reason for my unease is that my seventeen year old sister Cliona has profound ID as well as an extreme epilepsy syndrome that no seizure drug has ever been able to influence.

Nursing Frameworks of Care for Intellectual Disability Nursing – an overview

Registered Intellectual Disability Nurses (RNID’s) are unique, being the only group of professionals who are educated solely to work with people with an intellectual disability (ID) (Northway et al 2006). This specialised education is only available in Ireland and the UK. RNIDs work in a wide range of settings, and have a diversity of roles and skills (one of which is care planning)

WALKing the Walk: One Student’s Journey to Achieving His Potential

Meet Stephen Lyons, a student at the Institute of Technology Tallaght (ITT) who has travelled his own unique and difficult path towards achieving his goal of attending college and further developing his passion and skills in the area of Creative Digital Media. Stephen is highly regarded by his fellow students and lecturers alike and is described as being an active, contributing and popular student.

Housing Stories

I feel like I would be better off outside of the area. I don’t feel safe in the area because there are some dangerous people there. There were threats being made, and the guards investigated and they asked if there were more threats afterwards. Two weeks later there were more threats made towards me. I said to the social worker “if you can get me out of the area I would be prepared to move anywhere”.

QUALITY OF LIFE: What does it mean when your child has Autism?

Kyle
Quality of Life can mean a lot of things to society as a whole. For most people, it means a good job, nice house and car, family and money for luxuries, and then you are pretty much all set - right?...

Something meaningful to do every day should be a right enshrined in law

Youth unemployment in Ireland is currently over 22 percent, and Irish parents are heartbroken watching their young adult sons and daughters emigrate to far away shores for work as there is nothing here for them. As difficult as this is, these young people are, in my opinion, lucky as they are able to emigrate and find a meaningful occupation elsewhere...

RESPITE IS NOT SOME MYTHICAL UNICORN

As a parent cuddling my new baby, ‘respite’ was never a term or an idea that entered my head. To be honest, I had no real understanding of what that term entailed or would later come to mean in my daughter’s life, and mine. When Tess was born, I dreamed of my daughter growing up and all the typical girly adventures she would have and how nice it was that she had a sister to share all these moments with—school, boyfriends, weddings, babies—the list in my head was endless. Then, two and a half years later, without welcome or warning, came the diagnosis of autism.

Home is where the heart is

Marie is a 57-year-old woman. She came from Athlone to live in Moore Abbey Institution in Monasterevin in 1980 and she lived in what was known as ‘Main House,’ in a large unit style setting for group living. During the 1980s, Marie moved into a community residential house with 4 other people and she attended a day service with 16 other people...

A home at last

Alvernia House, in Portlaoise, closed its doors on 4 September 2012, with 27 people with intellectual disability moving into alternate living arrangements in community settings in the Midland area. The following is an account of one of these people, Philip Brady, and his progress so far in his new home...