Tuesday, December 12, 2017

Wellbeing

Understanding loneliness in older people with an Intellectual Disability

After spending a lifetime living in closed institutions older people with an intellectual disability are now being moved away from congregated settings into dispersed community living. For many this is indeed a very positive move, however concerns have also been raised about potential unintended negative impact on health and mortality at least for some (Kozma, Mansa & Beadle-Brown), 2009) Like immigrants in a new country some will reap the rewards and some will struggle to adjust. According to the Intellectual Disability Supplement to The Irish Longitudinal Study on Ageing (IDS-TILDA) around 50% of respondents experienced some degree of loneliness and 15% reported that they felt lonely most of the time...

EXPLORING THE NATURE OF RESPITE CARE IN INTELLECTUAL DISABILITY

Over 5600 people with intellectual disabilities (ID) in Ireland use a form of respite each yeaer (Health Research Board 2011). Although respite provision in Ireland has substantially increased over the past 16 years, it is projected that an additional 1211 individuals will require respite from 2012 to 2016. The Department of Health reported that 8000 individuals received centre-based respite in 2009, with a total pay cost of e52 million, and a total estimated cost of e70-2 million. They suggested that alternative models of respite care might be more cost-effective than the centre-based respite method (Department of Health (2012) Value for money and policy review of disability services in Ireland). The policy and empirical literature explicitly states the need to increase the availability of respite, and carers of individuals with ID commonly request this resource...

WELLBEING

As a psychologist, I suppose I should have a lot to say about wellbeing, although it is sometimes difficult to practice what I preach, particularly with two very small sons (Ted aged 2 years, 3 months, and Leo, a sparking 7 month old). I have, however, come across some bits of wisdom from the behavioural and medical sciences, and here are my top nine suggestions toward fostering your wellbeing...

SPECIAL SHOES FOR SPECIAL FEET

It is often said that no two feet are the same and for many people with disabilities an everyday challenge is finding comfortable footwear that meets their very specific needs. For some disabled people, making a trip to the shoe shop can be trying and unsettling—particularly if a shop assistant is not comfortable relating to a person with a...

Your Sleep and You

Sleep problems Have you ever had a bad night’s sleep—not being able to get to sleep, trouble staying asleep or indeed sleeping too much? If so, you may have a sleep problem and this may be caused by a variety of sleep disorders. Some common sleep disorders include sleepwalking, talking in your sleep, nightmares or clenching or grinding your teeth....

How do we support people with disabilites to have meaningful lives?

Darcy Elks, from Pennsylvania, came to the Sisters of Charity Services in the Midlands—St Mary’s, Delvin and Moore Abbey, Monasterevin—to meet with stakeholders, parents, service users, staff and managers with a message about inclusive lifestyles in a mainstream society. Darcy has lifelong experience in the process of de. institutionalisation; indeed, she worked as a volunteer in Willowbrook on Staten...

IS IT POSSIBLE TO ACCURATELY MEASURE THE QUALITY OF LIFE THAT PEOPLE WITH SEVERE AND PROFOUND INTELLECTUAL DISABILITIES EXPERIENCE?

Introduction Quality of life (QoL) for individuals with intellectual disabilities has been widely researched over the last two decades. Five researchers have been relatively prolific in writing papers and research articles: Felce, Perry, Hatton, Hensel and Cummins. There has been extensive research into measuring QoL for individuals with intellectual disabilities who are able to communicate, but very little research relating...

THE BENEFITS OF YOGA FOR PEOPLE WITH LEARNING DISABILITIES

Physical and mental therapy is one of yoga's most important achievements. What makes it so powerful and effective is the fact that it works on the holistic approach—the treatment of the whole person. (Swami Saraswati, Bihar School of Yoga, India) I practised yoga for a number of years in the USA and became a firm believer in the health-promoting aspects of...

MEASURES OF PLEASURE AND INTELLECTUAL DISABILITY

Introduction A recent series of articles published in the American Journal of Mental Retardation focused on the issue of happiness in the lives of people with intellectual disabilities. The aim of the series was to consider how happiness can be conceptualised, measured and facilitated for individuals who have an intellectual disability. Much of the research which has been carried out...

ASSESSING AND ENHANCING THE QUALITY OF LIFE OF PEOPLE WITH INTELLECTUAL DISABILITIES

Prof David Felce from the Welsh Centre for Learning Disabilities Applied Research Unit, examines the changing pattern of residential services in Britain and offers suggestions on ways of enhancing the quality of life of people receiving residential support. The number of people living in large hospitals in England and Wales has fallen by over 70 per cent in the...